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  • Metrics in Motion: Circadian Metrics

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This webinar will look back at the background of circadian metrics, and look forward to the opportunities and challenges facing the future development and implementation of circadian metrics in the built environment.

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    About this Course

    The IES offers Educational Webinars throughout the year, purposefully spanning a broad range of topics and speaker expertise. Metrics in Motion: Circadian Metrics was a live webinar, now available as an archived webinar and CEU course.

    Description: The enthusiasm for healthier buildings has aligned with advances in LED technology, controls, and research exploring the human biological response to light. This alignment has lead to a rise in health claims related to lighting, yet there is still much to learn regarding the relationship between light and human biology. This webinar will look back at the background of circadian metrics, and look forward to the opportunities and challenges facing the future development and implementation of circadian metrics in the built environment. 

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of this course learners will be able to...

    1. Discover the history of the research into light and its effects on human circadian rhythms. 
    2. Investigate the challenges that confront researchers in their search for the "magic pill" of light prescription. 
    3. Explore the way properties of light contribute to spaces that are welcoming, comforting, and relaxing. 
    4. Learn to understand and discuss circadian lighting with the appropriate terms and definitions. 

    Andrea Wilkerson

    Lighting Engineer

    Andrea Wilkerson is a lighting engineer at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, where she conducts lighting-science research for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Solid-State Lighting Program.

  • Metrics in Motion: Color Metrics

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This webinar will look at recent developments in the specification and evaluation of color rendition including an overview of TM-30-18 and subsequent developments. How those developments could change lighting practice over the next 10 years will also be explored.

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    About this Course

    The IES offers Educational Webinars throughout the year, purposefully spanning a broad range of topics and speaker expertise. Metrics in Motion: Color Metrics was a live webinar, now available as an archived webinar and CEU course.

    Description: After decades of debate and living with limitation, new color metrics for both color rendition and chromaticity have been standardized by the IES and/or CIE. While science has advanced, the practice has been slower to evolve. This webinar will look at recent developments and how they might change lighting practice over the next 10 years. It will demonstrate how all constituents in the lighting community can benefit from using metrics that fit the capabilities of today’s lighting technologies. Manufacturers can more effectively evaluate performance tradeoffs and communicate product performance, allowing differentiation with novel products; specifiers can reduce uncertainty and avoid unsightly consequences, and researchers can use improved methods to investigate fundamental lighting science challenges.

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of this course learners will be able to...

    1. Understand the history of chromaticity (color of light) measurement and utilize descriptors of it.   
    2. Explore concepts of color rendition including metamerism and chromatic adaptation. 
    3. Understand the basics of TM-30, and new supplemental information including Annex E. 
    4. Learn recommendations and limitations of color criteria in specification. 

    Michael Royer, PhD

    Michael Royer is a Senior Lighting Engineer at PNNL, where he focuses on the development of LED technology. His emphases are human factors experiments and developing new metrics and test methods, especially for color, glare, flicker, and long-term performance. Michael is a member of the IES Color Committee and Technical Procedures Committee, and is also active with the CIE. Prior to joining PNNL, Michael earned a Ph.D. in Architectural Engineering from Penn State University. Michael was named a future leader of lighting by LD+A magazine in 2010, and has authored over 50 journal articles and government reports, receiving the 2013 Taylor Technical Talent Award from the IES for his published work.

  • Metrics in Motion: Connected Lighting

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This webinar will address some of the questions being pursued in Connected Lighting research, such as how to evaluate the accuracy of energy and electrical data that can be reported by connected lighting systems, and how and where to measure energy use in systems that are capable of essentially continuous change, tuning, and adaptation.

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    About this Course

    The IES offers Educational Webinars throughout the year, purposefully spanning a broad range of topics and speaker expertise. Metrics in Motion: Connected Lighting was a live webinar, now available as an archived webinar and CEU course.

    Description: The combination of high-efficiency LED technology with seamless control and new features enabled by network connectivity presents a compelling vision for the future of lighting. Much work remains to translate that vision into successful installations, value-added functionality, and proven benefits, including energy efficiency. PNNL researchers are engaged in multiple studies designed to understand and quantify the performance of emerging connected lighting systems. In particular, the ability to measure energy performance at the device and system level is an important focus. This webinar will address some of the questions being pursued in this area, such as how to evaluate the accuracy of energy and electrical data that can be reported by connected lighting systems, and how and where to measure energy use in systems that are capable of essentially continuous change, tuning, and adaptation.

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of this course learners will be able to...

    1. Describe Connected Lighting and the system components (network devices, light sources, sensors, etc.) within it.
    2. Identify the benefits of energy monitoring and electrical data within a space, and how to interpret that data.   
    3. Explore lighting design criteria and the potential impact of Connected Lighting. 
    4. Consider traditional lighting energy metrics, and the influence Connected Lighting can have on the future of these metrics. 

    Michael Poplawski

    Senior Engineer

    Michael Poplawski joined PNNL in 2009 as a Senior Engineer following twelve years in the commercial semiconductor industry. His work experience includes stints with Motorola, ON Semiconductor, and a CMOS image sensor start-up, and in various functions including device engineering and reliability, circuit design, application support, and technical marketing. His current efforts focus on supporting the DOE Solid-State Lighting program, primarily in the areas of Connected Lighting System technology evaluation and demonstration, standards and specification development, and the estimation of lighting energy end-use consumption. Michael is a member of IES, IEEE, and ASHRAE; serves on multiple standards development committees; and consults with numerous energy efficiency organizations, specification bodies, and early adopters.

  • Metrics in Motion: Flicker & Glare

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This webinar will provide an up-to-date evaluation of progress in addressing flicker and glare (critical lighting quality factors), their implications for energy-efficient LED lighting, and where additional research is needed.

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    About this Course

    The IES offers Educational Webinars throughout the year, purposefully spanning a broad range of topics and speaker expertise. Metrics in Motion: Flicker & Glare was a live webinar, now available as an archived webinar and CEU course.

    Description: Flicker and glare are visual phenomena that have several things in common: both can range from mildly annoying to seriously disabling, both can be made worse by poorly designed LED lighting and better by good LED lighting, and both are the subject of research by PNNL that is helping to further industry-standard metrics, methods of measurement, and recommended practice. This webinar will provide an up-to-date evaluation of progress in addressing these critical lighting quality factors, their implications for energy-efficient LED lighting, and where additional research is needed. 

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of this course learners will be able to...

    1. Understand why LEDs (as wonderful as they are) have made the issues of glare and flicker more tricky, compared to conventional lighting technologies.  
    2. Learn some of the limitations and a proposed improvement to the UGR metric.  
    3. Acknowledge that flicker is an issue of the driver electronics and dimming systems, and compare several flicker metrics.  
    4. Learn some tips and tricks for identifying flicker from light sources.  

    Naomi Miller

    Senior Lighting Engineer

    Ms. Naomi Miller is a designer/scientist in the solid-state lighting program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Portland OR. Working to bridge the gap between technology and application, Miller promotes the wise use of LEDs, and works with industry to overcome the hurdles where LEDs are not ready for prime time. Miller has received over 30 architectural lighting design awards for projects ranging from churches to university science buildings, boutique hotels, supermarkets, and parking lots. She chaired the IES Quality of the Visual Environment committee for 8 years and was a principal member of the writing team for Light + Design: A Guide to Designing Quality Lighting for People and Buildings (DG-18-08). She is a Fellow of the IES and Fellow of the IALD.

  • Quantifying Luminaire Performance – How Luminaires are Photometered and How That Data is Applied in Lighting Simulations

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This seminar will cover the basics of how luminaires are photometered, how distributions and photometric centers are defined, near field/far field photometry, and the surprising importance of luminous geometry.

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    About this Course

    The IES offers Educational Webinars throughout the year, purposefully spanning a broad range of topics and speaker expertise. Quantifying Luminaire Performance was a live webinar, now available as an archived webinar and CEU course.

    Description: Luminaire performance needs to be quantified so designers can make informed decisions when selecting products as well as evaluate how those products will contribute to the lighting requirements of their projects. Learning how luminaire photometry is done allows you to better understand their performance data and how it should be applied. Details such as the orientation of the intensity distribution, the location of the photometric center and the luminous shape can all have significant impacts on your lighting simulations. It is critical to know the limits of the data supplied by the manufacturer and what is contained in IES files so that you can obtain the most accurate lighting simulations possible and avoid reworking projects that don’t perform as expected.

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of this course learners will be able to...

    1. Determine the difference between an integrating sphere and a goniometer.    
    2. Learn how photometric data is gathered (ies files) and applied in lighting simulations. 
    3. Explore the room for error absolute and relative photometry, as well as near field and far field photometry. 
    4. Explore different types of luminous shapes and ies file limitations. 

    Mark Jongewaard

    President/Principal

    Mark Jongewaard started as an illumination engineer at Lighting Technologies, Inc. (LTI) in 1989, later becoming vice president, director of the optics division and part-owner until 2006, when LTI was sold to Musco Sports Lighting. Since the sale, Mark and business partner Ryan Kelley led the formation of LTI Optics (LTIO), which spun off from Musco and continues the optics related business from LTI. This includes the development and sale of Photopia — the most widely used optical design software in the architectural lighting industry — as well as providing optical design services for illumination based (non-imaging) optical systems. He currently is president and principal of LTIO.

  • RP-29, Lighting for Hospitals and Healthcare Facilities

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The RP-29 document will be reviewed, describing the content organization and key factors that are critical concerns for all healthcare facilities.

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    About this Course

    The IES offers a series of webinars that provide supplemental education to coincide with a recently revised or new IES Standard (Recommended Practice - RP, Technical Memorandum - TM, etc.). RP-29, Lighting for Hospitals and Healthcare Facilities is part of the IES Standards Webinars

    Description: The RP-29 document will be reviewed, describing the content organization and key factors that are critical concerns for all healthcare facilities. Emphasis will be given to changes that have occurred since the last publication 10 years ago, presenting the reasons for those changes.

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of this course learners will be able to...

    1. Describe correlations between IES RP-29 and Facility Guidelines Institute (FGI) documents. 
    2. Explore the relationship between light and health. 
    3. Identify lighting specification needs to support safety, comfort, wellness, as well as other design and operational goals. 
    4. Understand emerging research and evidence-based research related to the impact of light on health and recovery rate. 

    Mary Alcaraz

    Senior Project Manager

    Mary Alcaraz, PE, LC, IALD, LEED BD+C, Senior Project Manager at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, is a leader in the implementation of power engineering and lighting systems for healthcare facilities. She has written numerous articles, won awards for lighting designs, and spoken internationally on healthcare, lighting and energy topics. She is currently a Board Member for the Designing Futures Foundation affiliated with the Charter High School for Architecture + Design in Philadelphia, and a Sub-Chair for the new release of the IES/ANSI RP-29 “Lighting for Hospitals and Healthcare Facilities”.

    Karen Lee

    Vertical and Applications Marketing

    Karen is the head of Vertical and Applications Marketing for LEDVANCE LLC, formerly OSRAM SYLVANIA, and has been in the lighting industry for over 25 years. With an engineering background, she has held roles in R&D, product development, product management, business development, education and marketing for all light source technologies in both general and specialty lighting applications.

    Karen Murphy

    Senior Professional Associate

    Karen is a Senior Professional Associate with HDR and has been an architectural lighting designer for over 25 years, working on several specialized healthcare and science & technology facilities.

  • RP-30, Museum Lighting and Lighting for Fine Art

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This presentation will provide insight into how to utilize IES’s new Recommended Practice for Museum Lighting (RP-30-17) to deal with the conundrum of preserving light-sensitive materials while providing a dynamic visitor experience.

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    About this Course

    The IES offers a series of webinars that provide supplemental education to coincide with a recently revised or new IES Standard (Recommended Practice - RP, Technical Memorandum - TM, etc.). RP-30, Museum Lighting and Lighting for Fine Art is part of the IES Standards Webinars

    Description: The paradox of museum lighting is that the same spectral energy used to illuminate museum displays also causes fragile materials like pigment, fabric, wood, and metal to deteriorate. This presentation will provide insight into how to utilize IES’s new Recommended Practice for Museum Lighting (RP-30-17) to deal with the conundrum of preserving light-sensitive materials while providing a dynamic visitor experience. 

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of this course learners will be able to...

    1. Describe the RP-30 document and recommendations therein, and review document navigation.  
    2. Identify lighting criteria that impacts the perception and interaction of color.   
    3. Understand unique challenges within the museum and fine art realm, and relate them to lighting selection and placement.  
    4. Explore typical lighting solutions for museum exhibitions. 

    Scott Rosenfeld

    Lighting Designer

    Scott Rosenfeld designs lighting for museums. Originally trained as a theatrical lighting designer, since 1997 Scott has worked at the Smithsonian American Art Museum and The Renwick Gallery in Washington D.C. The advent of LED lighting has led Scott to research new possibilities for manipulating the spectrum of light to enhance vision and slow the degradation of light sensitive materials. Scott frequently lectures about how lighting can allow visitors to better see and appreciate artwork at conferences including: DOE, AIA, IALD, IES, PACCIN and LFI. Scott is chair of the IES’s Museum and Art Gallery Committee.

  • RP-36, Maintenance in the LED Era

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    IES and NALMCO join together for a webinar overview of the Recommended Practice For Lighting Maintenance (RP-36-15).

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    About this Course

    The IES offers a series of webinars that provide supplemental education to coincide with a recently revised or new IES Standard (Recommended Practice - RP, Technical Memorandum - TM, etc.). RP-36, Maintenance in the LED Era is part of the IES Standards Webinars

    Description: Rather than being maintenance free, LED requires a change in maintenance practices more akin to stewardship than reactive replacement. Based on RP-36 and other information, this joint IES/NALMCO webinar will provide an overview of effective maintenance practices for indoor and outdoor LED lighting and control systems.

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of this course learners will be able to...
    1. Apply the purpose and benefits of planned maintenance to lighting projects.
    2. Understand typical lighting and control system behavior and how it relates to maintenance.
    3. Recommend maintenance best practices.
    4. Design lighting and control systems to minimize maintenance requirements.

    Chistopher C. Frank

    COO Colorado Lighting, Inc.

    Christopher C. Frank, CLEP, has been working in the industry since 1997 and is the Chief Operating Officer to ensure production efficiency, quality service and cost-effective management of resources for long time NALMCO member company COLORADO LIGHTING, INC. (CLI), founded in 1977. CLI provides sustainable energy efficient solutions from consultation through installation and recycling. Chris enhances the efficiency of a lighting system for customers through expert assistance in specifying which products will produce the greatest energy savings while providing maximum light output and what light level is most appropriate for the work environment as well as supplying and installing the new lighting products and maintaining the lighting system. Chris provides leadership to Colorado Lighting, Inc. enabling the company to be in the forefront of the industry. Chris sits on many industry advisory committees as well as serving as the current President for NALMCO. In addition to his industry work, Chris is also very active in the community. He currently serves as a member of the Adams County Board of Adjustments and helps coach little league baseball as well as hockey. But if asked – Chris’s biggest accomplishment is his family. Chris and his wife Kelli are kept very busy with their four children.

  • Synergistic Buildings in the Era of IoT

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    An introduction to the interconnected concept of synergistic systems through IoT connectivity within the built world.

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    About this Course

    The IES offers Educational Webinars throughout the year, purposefully spanning a broad range of topics and speaker expertise. Synergistic Buildings in the Era of IoT was a live webinar, now available as an archived webinar and CEU course.

    Description: A technological introduction to the interconnected concept of synergistic systems through IoT connectivity within the built world. Attendees will gain a conversational understanding of the technological and market fundamentals required to design and implement a practical information based building solution. Careful analysis will be given to the associated advantages and tradeoffs of these style systems given the technology that exists in the marketplace currently, as well as what is emerging.

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of this course learners will be able to...

    1. Define a Synergistic Building System and how it differs from building management systems, and individual control solutions (lighting, HVAC, security, etc.).
    2. Discuss the practical definition of IoT in the built world, and the idea of a sensory network.
    3. Define Hot Data, and explain how it relates to the idea of synergistic buildings, and plays into a building's ROI story.
    4. Discuss the current market conditions surrounding the practical deployment of IoT technology within the lighting space. 

    Michael C. Skurla

    Director of Product Strategy

    Mike has spent 22+ years in the building controls and automation field, with a strong specialty in electrical power distribution pertaining to lighting, HVAC, EMS, and larger building automation. A particular area of focus, sparked by his computer science educational background, has been M2M communication and analytics within the built world.

    Mike has lead the design/development of several network, dimming, power management, and power-control products now sold globally for several manufacturers and has previously written seminars for USGBC, IES, and contributed to several published articles on emerging building technologies as well as the market transformation occurring through the technological convergence of information technology and building technology.

  • TM-30, In 2018 and Beyond: Guidance for Improving Color Quality

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This webinar covers the history of the development of TM-30, and the updates included in the TM-30-18 publication.

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    About this Course

    The IES offers a series of webinars that provide supplemental education to coincide with a recently revised or new IES Standard (Recommended Practice - RP, Technical Memorandum - TM, etc.). TM-30, in 2018 and Beyond: Guidance for Improving Color Quality is part of the IES Standards Webinars

    Description: This presentation will cover updates to TM-30 (TM-30-18), and how ongoing research is providing knowledge that allows for improved color quality. It will discuss where TM-30 stands within the North American and international lighting communities and demonstrate new features that may be added over time (feedback welcome!). In general, the emphasis will be on translating science into practice, with a focus on specification and highlights of new products being designed using TM-30.

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of this course learners will be able to...

    1. Describe the history and evolution of color rendition measures. 
    2. Understand the information within TM-30, including the calculation framework. 
    3. Review key elements of TM-30 including Average Color Fidelity and Fidelity Index (Rf), Gamut Area and Gamut Index (Rg).  
    4. Read Vector Graphics to determine color characteristics of a light source. 

    Michael Royer, PhD

    Michael Royer is a Senior Lighting Engineer at PNNL, where he focuses on the development of LED technology. His emphases are human factors experiments and developing new metrics and test methods, especially for color, glare, flicker, and long-term performance. Michael is a member of the IES Color Committee and Technical Procedures Committee, and is also active with the CIE. Prior to joining PNNL, Michael earned a Ph.D. in Architectural Engineering from Penn State University. Michael was named a future leader of lighting by LD+A magazine in 2010, and has authored over 50 journal articles and government reports, receiving the 2013 Taylor Technical Talent Award from the IES for his published work.