Metrics in Motion Package

Metrics in Motion was a series of webinars produced in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Lab. Delivered by renowned experts in their respective fields, these webinars address current lighting quality factors and upcoming research. Please refer to the individual videos for a description of each course.

  • Metrics in Motion: Connected Lighting

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This webinar will address some of the questions being pursued in Connected Lighting research, such as how to evaluate the accuracy of energy and electrical data that can be reported by connected lighting systems, and how and where to measure energy use in systems that are capable of essentially continuous change, tuning, and adaptation.

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    About this Course

    The IES offers Educational Webinars throughout the year, purposefully spanning a broad range of topics and speaker expertise. Metrics in Motion: Connected Lighting was a live webinar, now available as an archived webinar and CEU course.

    Description: The combination of high-efficiency LED technology with seamless control and new features enabled by network connectivity presents a compelling vision for the future of lighting. Much work remains to translate that vision into successful installations, value-added functionality, and proven benefits, including energy efficiency. PNNL researchers are engaged in multiple studies designed to understand and quantify the performance of emerging connected lighting systems. In particular, the ability to measure energy performance at the device and system level is an important focus. This webinar will address some of the questions being pursued in this area, such as how to evaluate the accuracy of energy and electrical data that can be reported by connected lighting systems, and how and where to measure energy use in systems that are capable of essentially continuous change, tuning, and adaptation.

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of this course learners will be able to...

    1. Describe Connected Lighting and the system components (network devices, light sources, sensors, etc.) within it.
    2. Identify the benefits of energy monitoring and electrical data within a space, and how to interpret that data.   
    3. Explore lighting design criteria and the potential impact of Connected Lighting. 
    4. Consider traditional lighting energy metrics, and the influence Connected Lighting can have on the future of these metrics. 

    Michael Poplawski

    Senior Engineer

    Michael Poplawski joined PNNL in 2009 as a Senior Engineer following twelve years in the commercial semiconductor industry. His work experience includes stints with Motorola, ON Semiconductor, and a CMOS image sensor start-up, and in various functions including device engineering and reliability, circuit design, application support, and technical marketing. His current efforts focus on supporting the DOE Solid-State Lighting program, primarily in the areas of Connected Lighting System technology evaluation and demonstration, standards and specification development, and the estimation of lighting energy end-use consumption. Michael is a member of IES, IEEE, and ASHRAE; serves on multiple standards development committees; and consults with numerous energy efficiency organizations, specification bodies, and early adopters.

  • Metrics in Motion: Color Metrics

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This webinar will look at recent developments in the specification and evaluation of color rendition including an overview of TM-30-18 and subsequent developments. How those developments could change lighting practice over the next 10 years will also be explored.

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    About this Course

    The IES offers Educational Webinars throughout the year, purposefully spanning a broad range of topics and speaker expertise. Metrics in Motion: Color Metrics was a live webinar, now available as an archived webinar and CEU course.

    Description: After decades of debate and living with limitation, new color metrics for both color rendition and chromaticity have been standardized by the IES and/or CIE. While science has advanced, the practice has been slower to evolve. This webinar will look at recent developments and how they might change lighting practice over the next 10 years. It will demonstrate how all constituents in the lighting community can benefit from using metrics that fit the capabilities of today’s lighting technologies. Manufacturers can more effectively evaluate performance tradeoffs and communicate product performance, allowing differentiation with novel products; specifiers can reduce uncertainty and avoid unsightly consequences, and researchers can use improved methods to investigate fundamental lighting science challenges.

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of this course learners will be able to...

    1. Understand the history of chromaticity (color of light) measurement and utilize descriptors of it.   
    2. Explore concepts of color rendition including metamerism and chromatic adaptation. 
    3. Understand the basics of TM-30, and new supplemental information including Annex E. 
    4. Learn recommendations and limitations of color criteria in specification. 

    Michael Royer, PhD

    Dr. Michael Royer is a senior engineer at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), where he works on the Advanced Lighting Science and Technology Research program, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. His primary research area is human factors in lighting. He conducts experiments to help refine metrics and specification guidance, with the ultimate goals of advancing lighting quality to improve building occupants’ satisfaction and increasing the use of energy efficient lighting technologies. Michael is co-chair of the Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) Vision Science committee and a member of the Color Committee. He also serves on the International Commission on Illumination (CIE)-U.S. National Executive Committee and other CIE technical committees. He is an associate editor for the journal Lighting Research & Technology. Prior to joining PNNL, Michael earned a Ph.D. in Architectural Engineering from Penn State University, receiving the 2013 Taylor Technical Talent Award from the IES for his published work, which focused on tuning optical radiation for visual and nonvisual effects.

  • Metrics in Motion: Flicker & Glare

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This webinar will provide an up-to-date evaluation of progress in addressing flicker and glare (critical lighting quality factors), their implications for energy-efficient LED lighting, and where additional research is needed.

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    About this Course

    The IES offers Educational Webinars throughout the year, purposefully spanning a broad range of topics and speaker expertise. Metrics in Motion: Flicker & Glare was a live webinar, now available as an archived webinar and CEU course.

    Description: Flicker and glare are visual phenomena that have several things in common: both can range from mildly annoying to seriously disabling, both can be made worse by poorly designed LED lighting and better by good LED lighting, and both are the subject of research by PNNL that is helping to further industry-standard metrics, methods of measurement, and recommended practice. This webinar will provide an up-to-date evaluation of progress in addressing these critical lighting quality factors, their implications for energy-efficient LED lighting, and where additional research is needed. 

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of this course learners will be able to...

    1. Understand why LEDs (as wonderful as they are) have made the issues of glare and flicker more tricky, compared to conventional lighting technologies.  
    2. Learn some of the limitations and a proposed improvement to the UGR metric.  
    3. Acknowledge that flicker is an issue of the driver electronics and dimming systems, and compare several flicker metrics.  
    4. Learn some tips and tricks for identifying flicker from light sources.  

    Naomi Miller

    Senior Lighting Engineer

    Ms. Naomi Miller is a designer/scientist in the solid-state lighting program at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Portland OR. Working to bridge the gap between technology and application, Miller promotes the wise use of LEDs, and works with industry to overcome the hurdles where LEDs are not ready for prime time. Miller has received over 30 architectural lighting design awards for projects ranging from churches to university science buildings, boutique hotels, supermarkets, and parking lots. She chaired the IES Quality of the Visual Environment committee for 8 years and was a principal member of the writing team for Light + Design: A Guide to Designing Quality Lighting for People and Buildings (DG-18-08). She is a Fellow of the IES and Fellow of the IALD.

  • Metrics in Motion: Circadian Metrics

    Contains 4 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This webinar will look back at the background of circadian metrics, and look forward to the opportunities and challenges facing the future development and implementation of circadian metrics in the built environment.

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    About this Course

    The IES offers Educational Webinars throughout the year, purposefully spanning a broad range of topics and speaker expertise. Metrics in Motion: Circadian Metrics was a live webinar, now available as an archived webinar and CEU course.

    Description: The enthusiasm for healthier buildings has aligned with advances in LED technology, controls, and research exploring the human biological response to light. This alignment has lead to a rise in health claims related to lighting, yet there is still much to learn regarding the relationship between light and human biology. This webinar will look back at the background of circadian metrics, and look forward to the opportunities and challenges facing the future development and implementation of circadian metrics in the built environment. 

    Learning Objectives:

    By the end of this course learners will be able to...

    1. Discover the history of the research into light and its effects on human circadian rhythms. 
    2. Investigate the challenges that confront researchers in their search for the "magic pill" of light prescription. 
    3. Explore the way properties of light contribute to spaces that are welcoming, comforting, and relaxing. 
    4. Learn to understand and discuss circadian lighting with the appropriate terms and definitions. 

    Andrea Wilkerson

    Lighting Engineer

    Andrea Wilkerson is a senior lighting research engineer at PNNL, focusing on the evaluation of emerging lighting technology in support of the U.S. Department of Energy Solid-State Lighting program. Andrea serves on the IES Educational Facilities, Libraries and Offices Committee, the International Association of Lighting Designers Education Trust Board of Directors, and the National Council on Qualifications for the Lighting Professions Exam Committee.